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LJ Interests meme results



  1. body modification:
    Tattoos, piercings, implants, hormones, ect... Why not, if it suits your fancy? I like checking out the different ways people sculpt their bodies, as well as doing it myself. Even consciously making yourself more thin, muscular, fat and so on counts.
  2. creative writing:
    I find my attempts at creative writing to usually be pretty bad. But I enjoy reading other people's. I have not given up on striving to make mine better though.
  3. dream pop:
    Robin Guthrie(of the Cocteau Twins) was the first guitarist to inspire and influence my guitar style when I started playing baritone. I still enjoy the Cocteau Twins immensely. Ultra beautiful. I'm not into any other pure dream pop groups yet.
  4. experimental music:
    Always searching for people that push music into new realms. It's more difficult today than ever. I'm willing to bet it can still be done.
  5. healing:
    Healing myself now. Helping other people is admirable as well. Seeing how they do it themselves too.
  6. living:
    Not just in having a working body. Even better, leading the life you need to feel alive.
  7. mythology:
    Fun to compare mythologies, learn from them. I love the writings of Joseph Campbell.
  8. post-rock:
    So prog, symphonic. Sometimes avant-garde, energetic, ambient, poetic. When done well, it encompasses the vast majority of what I look for musically. The Swans pioneered this genre. Mogwai was the first official(and IMHO best) post-rock band.
  9. sound:
    I want to learn more about it and how to manipulate it.
  10. zen:
    I'm only beginning to learn about it. I like what I'm finding.


Enter your LJ user name, and 10 interests will be selected from your interest list.



Comments

( 2 comments — Leave a comment )
dirigibl
Jun. 2nd, 2006 05:07 am (UTC)
Part I
1. body modification:

I don't have any body modifications in the classic sense. I used to have pierced ears, but they kept getting infected, so I let them close up years ago. Perhaps this is one reason I never bothered to explore other piercing options. It is unlikely I will ever do so at this point in my life...

My body has been recently modified by cancer surgery--I had a complete hysterectomy and portions of my liver and bowels removed. As a result, I have a linear scar on my abdomen. I call it my zipper, since I've had to have it reopened for other subsequent surgeries.

As a result of one of these surgeries, I also used to have a double-loop ostomy. That's when your intestines are brought through the abdominal wall to bypass diseased or nonfunctional parts of your digestive system. The ostomy had two openings, one of which got prolapsed, and wound up looking like an elephant trunk. I called the one that excreted waste "Oscar the Pouch" and his silent partner (the elephant trunk) "Colin Bowel." Oscar and Colin were recently reunited inside my abdomen, hopefully to live happily ever after in holy excremony.

Body modifications mean different things to different people--symbols of deeply held beliefs, or indicators of personal strength of will, or tools of desire. For me, my zipper is the doorway of my cocoon, the birthplace of my "new becoming" through fear, and pain, and illness, and despair, to the light and life and love of a higher plane of thinking, feeling, and living. That's what the brink of death has given me, and I couldn't have found it anywhere or any way else.


2. creative writing:

I used to be a rather prolific poet. I took a ton of creative writing classes as a part of my coursework for a BA in English. I also published a few poems here and there, and even co-edited an avant-garde literary magazine. From time to time I still write poems, but more often I work on lyrics to my songs, whether they be Blood Ruby songs or Cyn Conrad songs.

I find songwriting more fulfilling in some ways than poetry writing, mostly because the appeal of songs goes far beyond the usual literary circles to a more general audience, people who aren't familiar with the modes and methods of poetry. It always amazes me what non-literary listeners get out of my lyrics and it is endlessly gratifying, whether the meaning or impressions they take away are what was intended or not.

Also, songwriting introduces an added dimension to writing through sound--not just a verbal performance, such as a reading, but something more, the language of music intersecting with language itself, communicating an emotional content that cannot be expressed verbally, out at the limits of language.


3. dream pop:

Liz Frasier of the Cocteau Twins is one of my biggest influences. The development of her voice--from a sort of Siouxsie Sioux toughness and warbly affectation to a soaring, operatic instrument of beauty--is truly inspiring, as is her triumphant return to singing after serious vocal chord damage. She is truly one of the great innovators in vocal technique--despite the damage it did to her--always experimenting and exploring new textures and embellishments. Though she adamently denies any connection to poetic sensibilities, many of her lyrics to me are as artful as the best sound and L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E poetry.


4. experimental music:

It's amazing to look back at the history of experimental music, especially how over time, what was considered experimental becomes part of accepted and even popular technique. Stuff that caused riots among indignant listeners and critics are the same stuff music historians study as works of genius.

What experimental music is, I think, is a constant questioning of what music *is.* Does it follow a certain set of mathematical rules? What happens if we apply a different set of mathematical rules? What makes a memorable melody? How can push the envelope on memory and music? What does our music say about our culture? How can we express emerging subcultures through music? What makes an instrument musical? Can we create new instruments, new sounds? Is music merely sound? Can it be other than sound? There is no end to the questions that can be posed, or the avenues that can be explored.


Continued in Part II...
dirigibl
Jun. 2nd, 2006 05:07 am (UTC)
Part II
5. healing:

Healing is not just science, not just medicine. True, this is an important part of healing, but there is no true healing without the involvement of the mind and heart. Healing is making whole. True healing brings relief from fear and despair as well as pain and illness. Illness lies not only in our physical being, but in our emotional and rational self. Without healing these other selves, physical healing is never enough, and sometimes, may not even work.

This time last year I was in Hospice with six weeks to live. Post-surgery, I was extremely weak, my digestive system shut down, my cancer had spread throughout my abdomen, and there was "nothing they could do" to save me. I did what I had to do and let go of all my possessions and everyone dear to me. And yet I didn't die. It will be a long time before I fully understand how I came to survive my ordeal, and I may never understand it. But I do know one thing: It was only when I could let go that I could rise above. And letting go and giving up are two very different things.


6. living:

I think we should all live our lives so that when we are on our deathbeds, we can look back and be satisfied at how we lived. For me, when I was on my deathbed, I was so grateful that I had done all the things I had. Like most people, I worked to keep a roof over my head and food on my table, but I also spent most of my free time doing creative things.

Instead of watching endless hours of TV, or drinking my youth away at parties or in bars, or obsessively cleaning my apartment, I edited a literary journal and encouraged and supported the work of hundreds of writers. I wrote dozens and dozens of songs and even sang some of them for the rest of the world. I also reached out to hundreds of other musicians and gave them support and encouragement. I was always ready to help others be their best creatively. These things gave me a sense of satisfaction, of a life well lived, though short. Now that I have been given another chance, I wouldn't want to live my life any other way than how I already have.


7. mythology:

I'm interested in the mythological themes that run through all cultures, and also in what each culture uniquely expresses through its unique take on mythology. I'm also interested in personal mythology--how we write our own stories about our lives to express our deepest convictions, and how we can learn to rewrite our own stories to empower ourselves.


8. post-rock:

I find this genre a rather loose label. It's like progressive rock for the oughts. Mostly it seems to be about breaking free of conventional rock and pop song forms, especially the "hit-making" structures like verse-chorus-verse-chorus-bridge-chorus and popular lyric themes. Some of Blood Ruby's work is somewhat in the post-rock vein, especially "Midsummer Fires," "Babel Babel," and our newest opus, "Light & Shadow." We call it neoprogressive rock, though, because my bandmates are more influenced by prog rock than post-rock.


9. sound:

BOING! ZING! POW! BANG! WHIRRRRRRRR...

10. zen:

Everything I know about Zen I wrote in "Shan Shui."


There. Now I'm "tired of myself" as well. :-D

Best,
Cynthia

====================================
Blood Ruby - blud roo'-bee (n.) atmospheric alternative music somewhere in the vein of dream pop, ethereal and neoprogressive rock
See also www.bloodruby.com
====================================
( 2 comments — Leave a comment )

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